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Posts Tagged ‘saining’

Oh my goodness.  Where has the time gone?  For those curious, I’m all moved into my new home!  Huzzah!  It was a stressful process that disrupted my spiritual practice, but sacrifice is necessary for change.  I’m starting to get back into things, though.  With that, I want to tie up loose ends and finish the 30 Days Magical Roots Challenge.  I’m going to keep this short and sweet as I still have boxes to unpack!  My focus will be how I’ve kept up (or struggled) with the following topics through the move.

Day 16: Connect with Mother Earth

Sometimes, I just took a moment to stand or sit outside, admiring my new yard.  Sometimes that’s all you need.

Day 17: Raise some energy

After I got my keys, the first thing I did was do a saining to purify and bless my home, and make peace with the spirits within and without.  I think I raised a decent amount of energy doing that, all things considered…

Day 18: Elemental magic

While I acknowledge the importance of the four elements in many traditions, I typically work with the Three Realms of Land, Sea, and Sky, as well as the Triple Hallows of Fire, Well, and Tree.  I often see them as corresponding with each other.  Today, I briefly meditated on them as I began putting my daily practice back together.

Day 19: Sacred Space/Circle Casting

I recreate the cosmos as is traditional in ADF Druid rites.  This is largely based on what we know about Indo-European ritual.  I haven’t done much of this lately…  But I did move in a circle when I sained my home.  Circles are sacred.  I like circles.

Day 20: Ethics

I should really reflect on the Nine Virtues and how they relate to moving…  This could be a future blog post.

Day 21: Symbols

Fire, water, trees, and spirals.  I’ve been especially connected to trees lately.  Connecting to them has been easiest for me at the moment.  Fire, and its connection to the heart and home, has also been significant to me.

Day 22: Self-Purification

Ahhh… that first shower after moving was certainly purifying.

Day 23: Book of Shadows/Grimoire

As I packed and unpacked, I rediscovered my first grimoire.  My first boyfriend gave me the journal for my birthday, and I filled that book with what I studied and my own illustrations.  It’s a beautiful piece that I treasure.  I haven’t updated my current grimoire.  I really should…

Day 24: Sabbats

I’ve been talking with my grove about making this the next workshop topic, specifically what our local wheel of the year is like.

Day 25: Esbats

For the last month, I’ve simply been going outside to observe and say some words.  I took note of my surroundings, trying to capture the view to memory.

Day 26: Create a sigil

Have not done this yet.  Thinking about making something to represent protection for my home…  I imagine something I could trace on my door when I leave.

Day 27: Healing

I’ve been all about self-care lately as we recover…  Tea, warm showers, chocolate…

Day 28: Magical Podcasts

I don’t listen to many, lately.  I don’t have a lot of time to devote to them.  I did listen to a lot of music while cleaning and painting, though…  My daughter and I like to dance and sing.  I don’t think she’d have patience for a podcast at this age.

Day 29: Astrology

My sun sign is Sagittarius.  I was instructed to look into my moon sign which is Aquarius.  Much to ponder…

Day 30: Make a commitment to yourself

Now that the pile of boxes is on the decline, my family and I are starting to settle.  As I returned to work and thus my routine this morning, I decided to revive my daily devotional.  I have not erected an altar yet because everything is in such a state of flux.  I’m working on a cabinet to serve such a role.  In the meantime, I simply stepped outside and poured an offering of my tea and bird seed.  I said prayers and took an omen for the day.  It felt right to start my day that way once more.
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If  you celebrate anything in December, it’s usually a busy time.  Regardless of the positives experienced, I think it’s safe to assume that most people are worn out after it’s all said and done.  I certainly felt depleted!  Today, I restored myself physically, intellectually, and spiritually.

Northern NY is finally getting snow!  The roads have been a bit messy, but that didn’t keep me from visiting my massage therapist at Harmony Day Spa.    I  go every other month or so for a basic Swedish massage from Ashley, although I have received hot and cold stone therapy, as well as a sound healing technique she offers.  She’s absolutely amazing, and I always feel rejuvenated when I leave.  I always say, some women treat themselves to shoes or manicures – I indulge in massage.  My back loves me for it!

As for the intellection restoration, I’m putting my spare time to good use and delving back into the academic side of ADF’s advanced study programs.  I reviewed what I left off on, and I’m hoping to finish IE Myth before I go back to work.  I can’t make any promises, but I am hoping!  I’m also working on Divination 2. I spent some time today pouring through Carmina Gadelica looking for examples of auguries with some success!  It’s so fascinating, and is deepening my understanding and experience with the Druid Animal Oracle cards I love so much.

I restored myself spiritually but going to my altar earlier for my weekly ritual.  Yes, I’ve kept that up weekly, but after such a busy, extended weekend, returning to my sacred space felt really good.  Time away from home almost always disrupts my daily devotionals and other routines.  Furthermore, I worked to clean and sain my altar.  The space needed a good cleansing. Taking the time to remove dust, incense ash, cat fur, and candle wax felt like removing cobwebs in my mind.  Taking pride in one’s spiritual focal point is a way of showing good hospitality to the Kindreds who visit, and the act reaffirms one’s commitments.  As we move to the secular New Year, I will be doing a lot more cleaning – both physical and spiritual.

 

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If you’re ever in the 1000 Islands, visit the Thousand Islands Art Center in Clayton, NY. They have exhibits and offer a variety of classes. Photo by Grey Catsidhe, 2014.

 

Last Sunday, I was called on by a friend in my community and protogrove to sain her workspace – the pottery studio at the Thousand Islands Art Center.  It was a wonderful experience for both of us, and I learned a lot!

I was extremely humbled when she asked me to perform this ritual.  She told me she felt I had the experience and that she trusted me.  Not only did this make me feel good about myself and the rituals I’ve been leading in the area, but it reminded me of why I started Northern Rivers Protogrove.  It’s always been for community.  Not only is gathering with like-minded people to celebrate the seasonal changes and honor the Kindreds deeply fulfilling to me, but it is to others as well.  When I started the study group that would evolve into Northern Rivers, the growing interest and feedback I received clearly showed that there was something lacking in the area.  I returned to my Initiate Letter of Intent in thinking about this because I remember writing a lot about community.  I wanted to continue within my tradition’s study programs to grow in my spirituality and to give back to others.  Agreeing to help my friend really reawakened that awareness of “calling” in me.  It takes a lot of work and preparation to serve the community, and there are challenges as I need to balance it with the needs of my other career and my family, but it’s still very important and deeply gratifying.

Before I agreed to help, I first asked why she wanted the saining.  I wanted to know if she desired a general blessing because of new beginnings and old, negative energy, or if she felt there was something darker there – an angry ghost, perhaps.  I very honestly told her that I have very little experience with such things and do not currently feel comfortably taking that on.  We have mutual trust and she also honestly told me that it wasn’t anything of the sort.  Because I never want to put my own sanity or my family’s safety in harm’s way, I don’t see myself performing sainings for anyone I haven’t known for a little while.  That trust is important.  Maybe, down the road, I’ll feel more comfortable helping strangers, but I just lack the experience right now.  It’s important to know your limits and establish your own boundaries based on what you honestly feel are your current skills.  Having done a yearly saining of my own home around the New Years (both secular and religious), I felt confident in my abilities, and my relationship with the Kindreds, for her needs.

Like I said, this was a positive experience for both of us.  She felt that the space was on the mend, and I felt myself putting my magical training to good use for a wonderful person. It can be intimidating to do magic and ritual for others, but leading seasonal rites for Northern Rivers has taught me that the best rituals are when I do what feels best in my heart and listen to my intuition.  That’s exactly what I did.  As soon as I allowed for that to happen, symbols started to jump out at me from the environment.  In our discussion after the ritual, it was revealed that many of my feelings had a real basis in what my friend was experiencing.  The omen, as well, was also very telling to both of us.  When that happens, it feels damn good!

Now I did learn some things to help me improve for the future.  Next time, I should tour the entire space beforehand.  I thought we would sain the studio only, but in reality she also wanted to attend to another storage area that belongs to the studio but was across the hallway.  I felt a bit clumsy and annoyed with myself when she revealed this mid-ritual, but it was easy to fix and incorporate into the rite.  As I always tell my grovies, we have to be able to think on-the-fly in ritual when necessary.  I also forgot to bring a separate bowl for offerings.  Thankfully, I set up a working altar right by a door so we were able to pour offerings in the garden nearby.

Gifts from a friend.  Photo by Grey Catsidhe, 2014.

Gifts from a friend. Photo by Grey Catsidhe, 2014.

Let me point out that, regardless of my belief that our clergy and elders should be compensated for their work, I didn’t go about this for any other reasons than to help a friend and hone my skills.  She surprised me after it all by gifting me with some of her favorite (locally made) incense and a dish that she made in the studio.  I was absolutely giddy with her gifts since they are things I can use in future magical workings!   These gifts are precious to me and will remind me of how good and fulfilling it is to give mack to my community.  Furthermore, this whole experience will help me complete some of my advanced Druidic studies within ADF!  Like Magic 2!  Go me!

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As part of Northern River’s Autumn Equinox ritual, we had a baby saining ceremony for Bee.  The rite was inspired by material gathered by Alexander Carmichael in Carmina Gadelica.  In the highlands, Pagan ceremony blended with the Christian idea of baptism.  Baptism was seen as a powerful force of order among those people.  It was the first initiation into the community and the Christian faith (191).  Baptism was valued so highly, and failure to receive one was such a frightening prospect that special cemeteries were set apart for the babies who died before receiving such a blessing.  Sad little places, they were often rocky and hard to get to.  “It was thought,” Carmichael explains, “that such a child had no soul; but it had a spirit, and this spirit, taran, entered into a rock and abode there, and became mac talla (son of rock), which is the Gaelic term for “echo” (190).  To me, that language suggest a fear of ghosts and/or angry spirits.

Although sainings have some of the familiar acts of a Christian baptism, it is to be viewed as more a blessing and protective charm rather than any sort of dedication to a specific religion.  The tradition seems to come from the midwives, or knee-women, who performed their own baptism prior to that given by the priests (189).  This was likely done for fear of infant mortality and how seriously the community viewed baptism as demonstrated above.  However, these midwife baptisms have language that suggests they’re carried over from earlier traditions.  There’s protective language against fairies and gnomes, for example (192).  Indeed, if  you read my earlier post about childbirth traditions in Ireland and Scotland, you’ll know that a fear of changelings was also very real to our ancestors.  To protect against otherworldly abduction, newborns were “handed to and fro across the fire three times, some words being addressed in an almost inaudible murmer to the fire-god.  It was then carried three times sunwise around the fire, some words being murmered to the sun-god” (189).

For our purposes, Rev. Skip Ellison of Muin Mound Grove performed the saining.  It was important to us that he do it because he married us a few years ago.  He asked that the Three Kindreds protect Bee.  He gave us an iron ring to keep near her to ward off malignant spirits.  I carried a candle around her as she was held by my husband. She was then given splashes of water, “wavelets,” to symbolically bestow various qualities.

A waveflet for thy form,
A wavelet for thy voice,
A wavelet for thy sweet speech;

A wavelet for thy luck,
A wavelet for thy good,
A wavelet for thy health;

A wavelet for thy throat,
A wavelet for thy pluck,
A wavelet for thy graciousness;
Nine waves for thy graciousness” (Ellison, 147).

Baby Bee after her saining. Photo by Grey Catsidhe, 2013.

It was decided that I would carry my daughter from person to person in the circle to receive their blessing. Indeed, this is traditional. Carmichael wrote, “At this function and feast the child is handed from person to person around the company, going deiseil, in a sunwise direction. Every person who takes the child is required to express a wish for its welfare. The wish may be in prose or in verse, but preferbably in verse and original if possible” (191) because poetry has the tendancy to endure.  Amazingly enough, Skip’s granddaughter, Dragyonfly, wrote an amazing song for Bee which she sang during this portion! We were given a copy of the lyrics as a gift. What a treasure!

Acorn favors I made for guests. Photo by Grey Catsidhe, 2013.

It was important to me that I show my saining guests hospitality in the form of a favor. I made several felted acorn ornaments for people to bring home. They’re reminders of their witnessing her blessing and what it meant. The basket was with us during the whole Autumn Equinox and saining ceremony so they could soak up all that goodness. I gave them out after feasting.

Baby Bee enjoying a fun bear blanket from Tara with a friend. So far, it’s the biggest blanket my daughter owns! Definitely good fort material! Photo by Grey Catsidhe, 2013.

Bee received several lovely gifts from people in addition to the song. Grovies gave her blankets and clothing. My mother gave her a cute fox coat and some money that we plan to use for a highchair. My sister and niece gave Bee a wonderful book about nature spirits and an original painting. My little family is truly blessed!

A beautiful quilt made by my grovies in Muin Mound. Everyone chose fabric and/or made their own squares. I have some truly talented friends! Photo by Grey Catsidhe, 2013.

An amazing painting by my sister for our little Bee! Photo by Grey Catsidhe, 2013.

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