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Posts Tagged ‘prayer’

Nine Virtues for Today

Today I meditate on the nine virtues to help me cope with what happened; with the direction my country takes. I call to the Kindreds for their guidance. 

I need wisdom to stay rational and to help  guide me through history’s spiral. May I share my wisdom with others to help them as needed. 

I need vision to be the change I wish to manifest and to help me focus on hope and peace. 

I need courage to stand up for the oppressed. 

I need piety to stay connected and anchored in the sacred through any turmoil. 

I need integrity if my ideals and values are challenged. 

I need perseverance to get through today and the next four years though bile continues to rise in my throat. 

I need moderation so that I continue to live lighter upon the Earth Mother even when society may take take take greedily. 

I need hospitality to give of myself to help those in need. 

I need fertility so that I stay and create positive change within my own community and country. 

Kindreds, hear my prayer and grant me the strength I need for this day and all days ahead. 

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I’m generally not a fan of weather magic. Nature is full of give and take. Calling rain from one area to another could be detrimental if that other area also needed it. And nobody wants flooding… So what to do when there’s already a drought? I suppose praying for rain isn’t wrong. We do need it, after all…  

My daughter and I drew some rain clouds and rain on the sidewalk. I then chanted:

Rain rain

Come our way. 

Water the plants. 

Don’t delay!

Wet the Earth. 

Make some mud. 

Maybe a storm. 

Just don’t flood! 

Even better if we get some today rather than Saturday when I’ll be out all day at the FAE Fest!

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Sugar pod peas poking out to say hello to the world! Photo by Grey Catsidhe, 2015.

 

My daughter and I took a walk around our home to celebrate Earth Day. Granted, we do this regularly, but why not do something outside today? It was chilly, so, regardless of what season the calendar says it is, we took our winter coats out.

First, we visited the container garden in back to inspect the newly planted onion set and the bed of dwarf sugar pod peas.  As you can see from the photo, the peas are germinating!  I’m hoping that their reputation for cold hardiness gets them through the low temperatures this week.  I may need to tuck them in for a few days each night!

Sticking close to the hedge, Bee and I wandered a little further  from home to look for signs of spring despite the chill.  Right off the bat, we heard a chorus of frogs in the marsh behind our home.  Each day we go out, I tell Bee that the sound comes from frogs, and she knows what they are due to lots of reading and animal-oriented shows.  She got down on all fours and proceeded to bounce, chanting “hop, hop, hop!”  That had to stop when we reached muddier terrain.  “Squish, squish, squish!” I said, picking her up.  Her boots aren’t as waterproof as mine.  Mud boots are on Bee’s birthday wish list!

I pointed to the white oak, but the buds weren’t as obvious on him. The maples had glorious, red buds that were bursting open.  Bee liked looking at them more.  I was able to hold her up so she could carefully touch them.  “Gentle, gentle,” I cooed.  She knows that word from interacting with our cats and my lemon tree.  “Twee.  Twee,” she said.

We reached a green hill, lovely and green after the rain we received, and Bee gleefully ran up with me.  She loves open spaces to race and explore.  We didn’t linger there long because the cold wind whipped our faces.  Bee held her hat as we gingerly climbed down.  We decided to go home.  Chilly wind equals snotty noses, and Bee needed a handkerchief.  Silly mama!  Why didn’t I pack one?  They’re necessary when out and about.

Between work and toddler care, I wasn’t able to do anything traditionally associated with Earth Day.  I didn’t attend a rally, pick up litter, or plant trees.  If my husband had been home, it would have been easier to manage a bag of litter (one parent handles the bag and the other watches the tot), but it’s hard when you’re on your own.  Earth Day was simple for me this year: a walk around our little patch of home, observing the natural changes.  We made offerings of birdseed to the local spirits and Earth Mother.  I said a prayer of thanks and Bee babbled, obviously trying to join in.  She solemnly blew a kiss to the trees when we were done.  Engaging in such activities today and every day will help raise a child who places value in the Earth, a child who is more likely to be intrinsically motivated to attend rallies, plant trees, and pick up litter when she’s older.  I’m laying the foundation.  Even if she decides that Druidism (or Paganism in general) is not the path for her, I will consider myself successful if she grows up to love and honor the Earth, and every being she shares her home with.

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Gratitude Towards the Sun

While I do a lot of solar-related reflection around the Winter and Summer Solstices, there’s nothing like a painfully cold day to bring the sun’s presence to our attention.  Although we were in the negatives today, there were very few clouds.  The sun shined brightly, adding a spring to my insulated step.  Every time I walked by or looked out a window at work, I was struck by the intense warmth the sun was projecting through the glass. Each time I passed through that warmth and light felt like a moment of deep communion with the Kindreds.  I often found myself taking the time to stop and say a short prayer of gratitude in whispered tones or in my head.

As we approach Imbolc, it seems like an appropriate time to contemplate the blessings of light and warmth.  My own UPG has brought me to view the sun as a symbol for Brighid’s warmth.  It is like her sacred fire, but glowing in the sky.  The promise of the sun’s renewed vigor is coming to fruition, and now we enjoy the increasing light and pray for more days like today – when warmth gives us comfort and hope.

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A lovely, moss-covered rock I encountered on my walk today.  Photo by Grey Catsidhe, 2014.

A lovely, moss-covered rock I encountered on my walk today. Photo by Grey Catsidhe, 2014.

Today I went to the forest to do a devotional. It’s a perfect day for that. The sky is clear, allowing the sun to hit the changing leaves. It makes them look like a brilliant flame!

As a precaution against hunters and bears, I donned a red jacket and, once I was in the forest, sang “We Approach the Sacred Grove” on my way to my little nemeton. When I got there, I circled clockwise, stopping before the oak tree. I then allowed myself to breathe and take in the beauty of my surroundings. I felt so at peace and thankful to be there. It’s something I look forward to each week. If I miss my walks for some reason, I do my devotionals inside, but there’s something extra special about doing them in the forest.

I called to Brighid as a Goddess of inspiration and as a gatekeeper. Like others in ADF, I have been experimenting with this portion of ritual and looking to the fire as the beginning of a ritual working upon reaching the sacred space. While I do not start fires in the forest, I look up to the sun as the great bonfire in the sky. I prayed to Brighid:

Lady Brighid, Goddess of flame,

I pray that your fire sparks the flames in my mind

Inspiring me to speak with truth, beauty, and eloquence.

I pray that your fire shines a light into the darkness,

Chasing away the negativity.

I pray that your fire’s smoke carry my prayers to the Other Worlds

And that you open the ways.

Lady Brighid – let the ways be open!

 

It is a work in progress. I feel that I tweak that process and prayer a little each time, but I like how it is working out.

I attuned with the fire, well, and tree, meditating on their symbolism and power. This is always very visceral for me when I’m outside. I focus on how I sense them. The sun’s warmth and light touches my face, the creek nearby often gurgles, or the sun glints off the raindrops on the leaves. The oak tree, which I lean on when I focus on the Two Powers, gives me strength and stability. The firm earth gives me a foundation on which to stand.

I sang to the Earth Mother, then bent to give her a kiss. Next, I prayed and gave offerings to the Three Kindreds, followed by special offerings for my spirit guide and patroness.

When I am in the woods, I meditate, but not the way I do inside. Being out in a forest, off a path, I need to be mindful of the possible dangers. I relax but generally don’t close my eyes. I stand against the oak tree and soften my gaze. I let myself truly open up to the sensations of the forest. My purpose in going to the forest is to commune with the land, with the Nature Spirits there, and praise the Kindred among the trees. I’m not trying to escape that in some way by visualizing an alternate grove. When I meditate in the forest, it is to fully immerse myself in that environment. When I leave, I carry that with me for all the times I pray and meditate inside. Going into the woods is like recharging a battery.

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I’ve been working on a nighttime prayer to say with my daughter and I think I’ve finally settled on wording that I like. What do you think?

“Goodnight Prayer” by Grey Catsidhe

Goodnight moon and goodnight sun
Goodnight every Shining One

Goodnight lake and goodnight pond
Goodnight loved ones from beyond

Goodnight Earth and goodnight tree
Goodnight nature all ’round me

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A White Coral Fungi – Photo by Grey Catsidhe, 2013

Originally, Northern Rivers Protogrove was going to meet today for a workshop and discussion.  That’s going to be rescheduled, but it gave me some free time to engage with Druidism in other ways.   I did something I’ve not felt up to in months – I took a walk in the forest. That’s right! It’s nice and cool so I donned a sweatshirt, long pants, and sneakers and crossed the hedge with offerings stuffed in my pockets.  I’ve missed the forest greatly, especially the clarity that comes from visiting.  It has the ability to put all of my petty worries into perspective and calm me into a more rational state when the less-than-petty things pile up.  Not to mention, I really needed to reestablish contact with the local wild spirits.  It had been way too long.

I spent a majority of my spring and summer focused, as many other Pagans, on birth and life.  Indeed, there was much life in the forest – white coral fungi, the chattering of chipmunks and squirrels, green leaves clinging to trees, and lots of ravenous mosquitos!  Returning to the forest, I was suddenly struck by so much decay.  There were large gray mushrooms littered across the forest floor that had been partially eaten by other creatures.  I’d never really thought about it before – the fungi that feed on the dead are, in turn, food for the living.  Life and death are two sides of the same coin and exist together in a dance we often don’t witness or care to admit knowledge of.

Driving the point home, I came across a very sad sight – a dying red squirrel.  He or she startled me at first because I frightened the poor thing.  S/he struggled to move, flopping clumsily, face pressed into the ground, before once more collapsing into a heap.  I watched, scared stiff that I might have stumbled onto a rabid creature, yet also deeply sad for the tiny life that was passing before me.  I didn’t see any wounds or foam at the mouth, so I’m not sure what brought about the squirrel’s demise.  I recognize the fact of death, and I think I’ve come to a certain mature understanding of it despite the sadness it still brings me.  It’s the sight of suffering that impacted me so.  I don’t often feel that when I see half-eaten mushrooms and I couldn’t help but wonder – were they also suffering – in stillness?  After all, the sight of a maimed tree makes my heart tighten – so why not a mushroom?  Even while recognizing the reality of death, there is nothing wrong with feeling sorrow that another must suffer.

Yet how to deal with that suffering?  Sometimes people talk about starfish washing up on the beach; you can’t put them all back.  Watching the squirrel writhe in pain then collapse, I felt helpless. I did what most people in such situations do – I prayed.  I wasn’t sure who to pray to.  I prayed to An Morrigan.  I prayed to An Cailleach.  I prayed to the spirit of the forest.  I prayed that the squirrel would not suffer long and would find peace in the Otherworld.

 

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