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Posts Tagged ‘Druidry’

Welcome to Three Things Thursday – your weekly dose of three mini posts in a larger post.

Virtual Vernal Equinox:

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A view of the ritual space in my back yard. I tried to make it as festive as possible with a green tablecloth, pastel bunnies, colored eggs, and an Airmed flag I sewed a couple years ago. Photo by M. A. Phillips 2020.

Life changed quickly due to Covid-19, and my grove adapted with an online ritual. Unlike other instances when we did virtual rites, I did all the parts. I wanted to make it as stress-free as possible, so I streamed what I did online and left quiet moments for those joining in to speak to the Kindreds at their own home altars. When I called to the Nature Spirits, a red squirrel shimmied really close, stared at me, then chirped! Online rituals are always awkward, but I tried to make it peaceful and simple. People from out of town took part or viewed it later. I’m glad that I helped others find some comfort in a scary time. It was certainly a learning experience!

Devotionals with my Daughter:

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Like many of you, I’m groping through this whole social distancing experience. As I figure out how to balance teaching my students online and keeping my daughter on some sort of educational routine, I decided to include her in morning devotionals. I usually do them on my own before heading to work, but lately I felt it was important to make it more of a family affair. She cuddles up and hugs me while we take three calming breaths. I’ve had to shorten my ritual a little, and I let her choose who she makes offerings to. I think she’s finally at a perfect age to appreciate the added comfort.

Writing Update:

As I wait for feedback on RIVER MAGIC, I’m doing my best to keep busy and improve my craft. A sequel is taking shape in the form of an outline, and I’m working on a flash fiction inspired by the Adirondack Center for Writing’s prompt. Stuck at home, writing is even more important to me. It’s an outlet and escape. It’s another way to connect to others. I’m so grateful for Brigid’s inspiration.

How are you creating and connecting to others while staying inside?

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Once more, I’m squishing three mini blog posts together into a big one for your viewing pleasure! Here you’ll find some musings on the Spring Equinox, an activity for you to do with the little ones during isolation, and a new excerpt from an upcoming short story!

Growing Food

 

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Lettuce I’m regrowing. The CSA I got it from included the root ball, so I just plopped it back in a pot and watered. Now it’s regrowing! Photo by M. A. Phillips, 2020

My seeds from Pinetree Garden Seeds arrived a couple days ago, promptly followed by the grow lights I ordered to improve my success. With everything shutting down, the shortages, and uncertainty, growing some food at home seems more important than ever. Each little seed is a packet of hope for the future. I enjoy blessing the seeds and planting them as part of our family Spring Equinox observations. If you’re new to gardening, there are plenty of resources online, but some of the easiest plants to grow in my experience are lettuce greens, peas, and chives. Chives will flourish year after year as they are self-seeding  (and quite invasive if you let them have their way). They’re a harbinger of spring in my garden, and even thrive left in pots left out over the winter. I enjoy snips of chives in my salads, potatoes, soups, and stews.

An Equinox Scavenger Hunt

Equinox Scavenger Hunt

My daughter is sad that she’s not able to celebrate the spring with our grovies. She always enjoyed doing an egg hunt and running around outside with the other kids. When the news reported that the virus reached the West Coast, I started buying one treat each grocery visit to ensure I had a basket for her. I also plan to do a scavenger hunt. I made a graphic using free clip art on Canva.com and am including it here for you if you like! I designed it for either hemisphere, and I emphasized the three realms in a kid-friendly way. It’s meant to be open-ended. Your child doesn’t have to find a bee, for example. It could be any insect flying in the sky. Any water will do – whether you go on a nature walk, look out your window, down from your balcony, or search for pictures and videos online. The important thing is you’re having conversations with your children and reflecting on seasonal changes.

A New Excerpt

Invasives excerpt

I push down the urge to utter a curse. My mind is too rattled to fuse words coherently without causing more harm than intended.
Invasives
by M. A. Phillips

I shared a sneak peek into an upcoming short story called “Invasives” on my instagram. I’ll talk about it more as we approach Bealtain, but I’m really excited for you to see it in issue three of Stone, Root, and Bone magazine! As always, I like adding excerpts to my Three Things Thursday posts since not all of my readers use that social media. Speaking of Stone, Root, and Bone, issue one is available for free this month! Just enter the promo code SRB1FREE when you check out. You’ll be able to read my short story “Lemon Balm Tea!” Let me know what you think.

Stay well everyone.

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Chives emerge from the herb bed after a long winter. Photo by M. A. Phillips

The last few days have been tense. My county currently has zero confirmed cases of the new corona virus, my state has quickly jumped to the top of the pile. While schools just a couple hours away are closing for two to three weeks, we’re all waiting and trying to maintain normalcy.

We see the panic and fear on the internet as people post photos of empty toilet paper shelves in store after store. My colleagues who are older or have compromised immune systems teeter from nervous to petrified. The kids are flippant to skittish.

I’m trying to maintain calm and yet be a healthy level of prepared. Seeing examples of kindness buoy my spirits: friends and acquaintances in other hard-hit places offering lunches to kids at home without other food, reminders to donate to pantries, people opening their homes to others in need, and helping strangers find and reach supplies in grocery stores.

Druidry values hospitality, and I see that alive and well. Sure, someone posted a video of people fighting over TP, but I see an overwhelming and heartwarming flood of helpers.

I went outside today to get some fresh air and discovered the chives are waking up. It’s another reminder that the hard times come to an end eventually. I pray they don’t last long, but at least I’ll have some herbs to share soon.

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Once more, three mini posts inside a big one! Trying to remain positive in light of a lot of anxiety at the moment.

A Low-Key Full Moon

I had plans for the full moon, and they collapsed, much as I did into bed, that night. The impact of losing an hour is amazing (on top of coming out of an intense Mercury in retrograde). This is unusual for me as full moons find me more energetic! After some reflection, I realized it’s okay. Listening to our bodies is important, after all. I altered my plans and did a simple folk charm during my devotional, and I prepared a bone to join the nature shrine. While I lacked the energy for my initial plans, I think everything turned out in the end.

Tree Spirit!

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Plush oak tree spirit made by M. A. Phillips 3/12/20 (Forgive the appearance of my sleeping garden.)

Writing has been my main focus for a few years now, but if you’ve been with me since the beginning, you know I also love to sew. I used to make (and sell) tree spirits at craft fairs, Pagan Prides, and on my now shuttered Etsy. Last year, a friend from a local artisan co-op approached me about adding some to their stock. I wasn’t ready last year, but I’m making some for this summer! The best part? Unlike before, this lovely little guy is made without plastic. That’s right! The felt and stuffing are wool, the thread is cotton, and the eyes are glass. Mindfully choosing materials that are less detrimental to the environment is very important to me, and I think it adds to the magic of these little sprites. Making him sure added a spot of sunshine to my week!

A New Excerpt!

ch 2 excerpt lidia's store

Lidia spread her arms wide. “Presenting the yet-to-be-named boutique of magic and shenanigans!”
Cian and Lacey chuckled in admiration. Not even Mark’s skepticism could deflate her plans.
“It must have shenanigans if you’re involved,” Cian pointed out.
“It must,” Lacey agreed. “It wouldn’t be Lidia’s store without it.”
The other woman flashed an impish grin. The streetlights shimmered in her green and blond hair. She twinkled like a shooting star. Lidia seemed to have everything figured out, and it transfixed Lacey.
RIVER MAGIC by M. A. Phillips

I’m still participating in the Dark and Light Author Challenge over on Instagram. Check mine out for more insight into my novel, RIVER MAGIC. The above excerpt gives a little glimpse at one of my favorite secondary characters, Lidia. She’s an eclectic solitary Wiccan who opens a metaphysical shop in their community. She’s also one of Lacey’s best friends and confidants. One day, I will write a whole story focused on her.

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Sun shimmering on ice. Photo by M. A. Phillips 2020

As my path is bound to the land, I continually work to pay attention to the seasons. In Druidry and other polytheistic paths, we tune into the cycles. Tradition emphasizes agricultural shifts, but they are always linked to whatever song the bioregion is singing at the time.

In elementary school, teachers taught us about the four seasons. I don’t doubt that my parents taught me first, but I distinctly remember dividing a circle into four equal parts and filling it with different colored balls of scrunched up tissue paper in a primary classroom. Yellow flowers, green leaves, orange leaves, and white snow. As I grew up and embraced a polytheistic view, everything become more complex. In a good way!

Many of us modern Pagans subscribe to some form of the Wheel of the Year. I’m not here to untangle that cultural knot, but there’s no denying many of us celebrate roughly eight holidays. Some may practice more or less depending on cultural focus. Then there is the emphasis some place on the lunar cycle.

This time of year, where I live, it is still winter. While others around the globe post photos of flowers or spring floods, we have a foot or two of snow on the ground. In my opinion, February is the hardest month. Many of us in Upstate New York are at our limit of tolerance for the white stuff. Even while I strive to find the silver lining and embrace the Winter Crone’s lessons, her teaching is arduous and painful at times. February brings more daylight. The sun melts the snow, but the temperatures drop below zero at night. Each morning, there’s a new layer of ice. The photo above is my driveway. It’s a sheet of hazardous winter glass hungry for broken bones. To get to my car, I’ve started wearing a pair of ice fishing cleats.

Our winter is more nuanced than a picturesque Christmas card. December, January, February, and March each have their own defining characteristics. The Winter Crone performs a different spell for each and alters her teachings. Paying attention to the subtle changes can enrich our daily practice. As we develop a ritual of mindful observation each month or lunar cycle, we should start to notice patterns – seasons within seasons. These will fuel our traditional practices and perhaps inspire new customs.

 

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Here’s another installment of Three Things Thursday – three mini posts nestled together in one for your viewing pleasure! Three is a magic number, right?

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Offerings at an outdoor shrine in the backyard. Photo by M. A. Phillips

 

Keep Making Offerings: The sun is shining, but if you go outside, the bitter cold will slap you in the face. Still, I felt compelled to put some offerings at the shrine. It’s important to listen to those urges as it helps us build and maintain relations with our spirit allies. I kept sensing a hunger from my closest magical companion. Sidebar: my husband helped me make that weathered sign for a local Faery festival. It now sits proudly by the shrine, adding a touch of whimsy to what is otherwise a half barrel filled with snow this time of year.

Writing Update: Since I’m on vacation this week, I’ve spent a lot of it editing my novel. I’m really proud of my progress as a writer, and sharing excerpts throughout February is both a testament to, and a balm for, my confidence. I’m glad that a story about contemporary Pagans is resonating with others.

River Magic _Famous Quote

An excerpt from my novel, RIVER MAGIC:
“What should we do?” he asked. “Make an offering?”
“We shouldn’t leave anything. ‘Leave nothing but footprints,'” she quoted.
He winced at his own folly.
“But I think a little drop of our water wouldn’t hurt.”

Slow Seeing: I loved this NPR article called “A Photographer’s Guide to Slow Seeing the Beauty in Everyday Nature.” I think many polytheists and animists will relate to the poetry of it, and those who are interested in this spiritual path should consider it. Along with editing, I plan to take my daughter outside to do some slow seeing today!

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Locally found or made magical objects. Photo by M. A. Phillips, 2020

Valentine’s Day brings a focus on relationships. Though I don’t observe the holiday with my husband (my daughter is obsessed with it), I’ve spent the week thinking about my connection to the land. Perhaps it’s the lingering winter and my desire to garden and forage again, or maybe it comes from my discipline kicking in when I don’t want to trudge through frigid snow with offerings.

My spirituality is very much concerned with the earth, and so it makes sense that most of what I work with is locally grown and made. Whenever I go through bouts of “distance” with my path, I always restore it in the garden or forest.

When I took the recent Imbolc course on Irish Pagan School, author and teacher Lora O’Brien discussed her issue with pipe cleaner Brigid crosses. My grove has done them in the past – mostly because they’re easier for the little kids – yet I’ve always preferred using actual wheat or local grasses. O’brien really hit the nail on the head for me when she described the plants, traditionally reeds, as a way to connect with the symbolism of the goddess and holiday. She was really critical of adults (without any mobility issues) taking a shortcut that is normally so rooted in nature’s seasonal changes, yet she tempered this with compassion. We are all learning. To paraphrase, she challenged those without access to reeds or something similar to begin planning for next year to secure a local source. (Provided you have permission, it’s a sustainable source, etc)

In Northern NY, where the windchill was -20 last night, now is a perfect time to contemplate the warmer half of the year. What do we need to do to deepen our relationship with nature? What are your long term magical goals, and what allies do you need to cultivate? What tools or offerings do you wish to procure for the upcoming holidays? When will the plants be ready to harvest? What do the spirits you wish to work with desire in return?

When I look back at some of what I’ve gathered, it fills me with warmth. Rowan branches collected on a nearby island following a storm. Stones from rivers and lakes right here as opposed to a distant pit and mined by child laborers. Beeswax candles from local keepers. Mugwort wands from my own garden. I’m excited to strengthen my bonds with the spirits of this place, but it must be done thoughtfully.

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