Unexpected Pineappleweed

 

 

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Transplanted wild chamomile. Photo by Grey Catsidhe, 2014.

Earlier I went out to lunch with my husband. We stopped in The Mustard Seed, a local health food store and cafe. We sat beneath a big poster displaying a variety of medicinal herbs. Weretoad asked if I had ever encountered chamomile in the wild and I said that I had not but would love to find it one day.

Sometimes the Kindreds hear you.

A delightful downpour welcomed me home after work this afternoon. Rather than rushing inside, I took a moment to revel in the cool relief the rain brought. I was rewarded with a welcomed sight – a few small patch of plants that looked like chamomile, growing right near my home!  Some research confirmed that I had discovered wild chamomile – aka “pineappleweed.”  The scent of it’s conical blossoms gave it its name.  I decided to try transplanting a couple.  Others online advised that I should trim the tops a bit to promote root growth after transplanting, so you won’t see the blossoms that gave it away in my photograph.  I brought those in and promptly brewed a cup of tea!  Well… after I gave thanks.  I disturbed some ants while digging up my new plant allies, so I gave them a peace offering of sugar-in-the-raw.

May the ants know my respect and the wild chamomile thrive both in and out of my pots!  I’m grateful the Kindreds finally allowed me to find this chamomile.  Clearly the time was right.

 

Published by M. A. Phillips

An author and Druid living in Northern NY.

3 thoughts on “Unexpected Pineappleweed

  1. Back when I lived in the Netherlands, we would go out to the fields in summer and collect bags of chamomile flowers, enough to ensure a stable supply of tea for the whole winter to come. Absolutely delightful.
    ~The Homesteading Hippy

  2. That’s so great! I’m growing Chamomile in my garden and it’s so beautiful. I have a question: this is my first time ever growing Chamomile and making tea fresh from the plant. Is it the flower or the leaves you use to make tea?

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